Tonight’s TV: Walking Scotland’s Lost Railways and Grayson’s Art Club Exhibition – The National

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DURING the first lockdown, the Turner Prize-winning potter won new fans by hosting an art club from his studio. His wife, Philippa, showcased her own artistic talents and the couple invited celebrities and members of the public to submit their own responses. Perry promised he would organise an exhibition of selected pieces, which was expected to take place last month. The second lockdown put paid to that but there’s a chance to see the preparations and to hear from those whose art will feature in the show when it can eventually open.

Walking Scotland’s Lost Railways (C5, 8pm)

ROB Bell and his sturdy hiking boots tackle a 70-mile route which was once travelled by those using the Callander and Oban Railway. The line was ambitious, expensive and a challenge to keep running throughout the region’s often harsh winters. It took 14 years to complete, lasted for the best part of a century and, as Bell discovers, helped to change the Victorian perception of the region by opening it up to visitors who loved the local mountains, lochs and valleys.

The Sound of TV with Neil Brand (BBC4, 9pm)

BRAND’S previous BBC Four series – Sound of Cinema, Sound of Song and Sound of Movie Musicals – have all gone down a treat with viewers and critics alike, so his latest offering is rather eagerly awaited. He announced it on social media a year ago and now, at long last, it’s here. The pianist, composer, writer and presenter offers his expert opinion on some classic small-screen themes while guiding us through the ways in which soundtrack writers help create mood and keep viewers hooked.

Waterhole: Africa’s Animal Oasis (BBC2, 9pm)

FILMED in collaboration with the Mwiba Wildlife Reserve in Tanzania, this three-part documentary reveals the importance of waterholes to the African ecosystem. At the beginning of the dry season, a new waterhole is dug by the programme’s crew, enabling Chris Packham and biologist Ella Al-Shamahi to get up close to the animals using it. Before long, they’re able to observe the many different thirsty species dropping by, and figure out which of them are willing to share.

Source: thenational.scot

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